Colorado River Commission of Nevada
555 E Washington Ave #3100 | Las Vegas, NV 89101 | 702.486.2670

Our History

See additional information at the State of Nevada Library Archives

2007CRC authorized its chairman to execute an agreement between Arizona and Nevada parties regarding distribution of Colorado River water during shortages declared by the Secretary of the Interior.
2007The CRC chairman is also authorized to execute an agreement among the Arizona Dep't of Water Resources, Colorado River Board of California, State of Colorado, New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, Utah Division of Water Resources, State of Wyoming, and the SNWA regarding Colorado River reservoir operations and management.
2007Chapter 427, Statutes of Nevada 2007 (Senate Bill 301 of the 74th Session of the Nevada Legislature) transferred to Clark County the CRC's responsibility for developing land in the Fort Mohave Valley near Laughlin, Nevada.
2006The energy power supply agreement with the SNWA is amended to expand its scope to SNWA's member agencies who desire to participate. CRC's Energy Services Group began purchasing power to serve certain pumping loads of the Las Vegas Valley Water District.
2006Commission's contract with the Western Area Power Administration for hydroelectric power from the Parker-Davis Project is extended from October 1, 2008, to September 30, 2028, and CRC approved renewal contracts with its seven customers for delivery of this power for that period.
2005CRC sold approximately 110 acres of CRC land in the Fort Mohave Valley to Riverside Developments, LLC.
2005CRC and the Nevada Power Company enter a series of cooperative agreements governing their business relationships going forward.
2005CRC approved agreements for the implementation and funding of the 50-year Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program.
2005The Secretary of the Interior began a process to develop lower basin water shortage guidelines and explore management options for the coordinated operation of Lakes Powell and Mead.
2004A new electric power supply agreement with the Southern Nevada Water Authority is approved, highlighting CRC's role as a power procurement agent of the SNWA, and clarifying the respective responsibilities of the CRC and the SNWA for the construction and operation of certain facilities, generating assets, and transmission and distribution lines.
2004CRC entered into new contracts for supplemental electric power supply services to its retail customers that provided for short-term CRC purchases of power to cover deficiencies in their hydropower resources, and allowed for customer-supplied power through long-term supplemental power purchase contracts directly with electric power producers.
2004CRC approved renewal contracts with its four customers for delivery of hydroelectric power produced at the Salt Lake City Integrated Projects from October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2024.
2004A Storage and Interstate Release Agreement and an Operational Agreement for Interstate Water Banking are approved with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and the SNWA.
2003CRC established a land management subcommittee of the Commission to review the current laws, policies and procedures pertaining to the management of CRC lands in the Fort Mohave Valley and provide more detailed information and closer consultation concerning the conditions that affect economic development in the Laughlin area.
2002A formal energy risk management program is adopted to guide CRC in its purchases of electric power on the open market.
2002CRC adopted a permanent regulation providing for periodic review of the creditworthiness of certain electric power customers, minimum amounts of required collateral, and discontinuance of electric service and reallocation of power under certain circumstances.
2001CRC became a member of the Western Systems Power Pool (WSPP), enabling it to buy and sell electric power with over 200 other WSPP members under the terms and conditions of a single WSPP Agreement, and replacing about two dozen individual enabling agreements with power suppliers.
2001CRC entered into enabling agreements with its retail power customers to provide electric power supplemental to their hydroelectric power allocation on both a long-term and short-term basis.
2001CRC approved the first in a couple of agreements with the Arizona Water Banking Authority and the SNWA that provides for banking of up to 1.2 million acre-feet of Colorado River water in Arizona for later use by the SNWA in Nevada.
2000CRC began a series of workshops on the proper valuation and pass-through of the benefits of Hoover B power to the residential customers of the Nevada Power Company.
2000Congress enacted the Griffith Project Repayment and Conveyance Act, directing the Secretary of the Interior to convey the Griffith Project (the federal portion of the Southern Nevada Water System) to the SNWA in return for full satisfaction of the federal repayment obligation.
1999CRC approved the River Mountains Project Construction and Ownership Agreement with Nevada Power Company and the SNWA to provide the 230-kV transmission system necessary to serve the SNWA's facilities.
1999CRC's contract with the Western Area Power Administration for power from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects is extended from October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2024.
1999Secretary of the Interior adopted regulations authorizing the Secretary and the Bureau of Reclamation to enter into Colorado River water storage and interstate release agreements with authorized entities in storing states and consuming states.
1998The Eastside and Newport Substations, serving the Power Delivery Project, were completed and energized.
1998CRC and the Southern Nevada Water Authority entered into an energy supply agreement under which CRC purchases electricity to serve the pumping loads of the SNWA. At the same time, and through 2001, CRC approved separate agreements with several power suppliers for this purpose.
1998Several years of negotiations finally concluded in a contract among the Bureau of Reclamation, the Western Area Power Administration, and Project firm electric service contractors, including the CRC, to advance funds for the operation, maintenance and replacement costs of the generation facilities of the Parker-Davis Project. A parallel contract with CRC's Parker-Davis customers was approved.
1997The CRC began discussions with the State of Arizona for off-stream storage of water. The Arizona Water Bank is viewed as a first step to provide an interim supplemental water source for southern Nevada.
1997Legislation confirmed the responsibility of the CRC to sell electricity and provide transmission and distribution service to meet existing and future requirements of certain power customers (NRS 704.787).
1997Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Work Group was formed to provide stakeholders, including the CRC, with involvement in federal decisions concerning the operation of Glen Canyon Dam and Power Plant.
1996CRC entered the first in a series of agreements with the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) for the development of an electric power delivery system to provide electricity for new water pumping and treatment facilities constructed by the SNWA. CRC developed plans to construct, own, operate, and maintain a complete electric power distribution system to serve the SNWA facilities.
1996Negotiations were initiated for the Parker-Davis Project operation and maintenance advance funding agreement.
1996The development of a 50-year program to conserve and work toward the recovery of endangered species and protect and maintain wildlife habitat on the lower Colorado River is begun by the CRC, together with its power customers and the SNWA, the federal government and other lower basin states.
1996CRC approved contracts with the Western Area Power Administration to begin construction of the Basic Step-Down Yard Project, which improved the functionality and safety of a key facility for delivering power to the Basic Management Industrial Complex.
1995Effective on January 1, 1996, Nevada law provided for the transfer of the Southern Nevada Water System from the CRC to the Southern Nevada Water Authority.
1995Negotiations completed with the federal government for the purchase of the Eldorado Valley Transfer Area. CRC agreed to sell the land to Boulder City, Nevada, at cost. Majority of land dedicated to Clark County for an endangered species preserve.
1994Cooperative agreement was reached between the CRC and the Southern Nevada Water Authority for construction, operation, and maintenance of major capital improvements to the Southern Nevada Water System.
1994Memorandum of Agreement signed for development of a Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Plan between state agencies in Nevada, California, and Arizona and federal agencies, including the Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Park Service.
1994Boulder Canyon Project Implementation Agreement signed as the result of negotiations to resolve issues related to the management, operations, and maintenance of the Boulder Canyon Project. Under the new agreement, Nevada and the other Hoover Contractors were given a voice in operation of Hoover Dam and in federal spending for the dam and its power plant.
1994Nevada Water Summit conducted to hear proposals for bringing new water to southern Nevada. The "Nevada Initiative" was introduced, calling for the establishment of a water bank in the lower Colorado River basin.
1993Nevada Legislature reorganized the Colorado River Commission by expanding it to a seven-member Commission, four appointed by the governor and three appointed by the Southern Nevada Water Authority.
1992Southern Nevada Water System improvements project began.
1991State law expanded CRC's authority to enter into agreements concerning interstate and international water transfers, Colorado River augmentation, and the operation of federal dams and other facilities on the river.
1991Nevada law and CRC regulations clarified the procedures and criteria to be used in acting upon applications for the original appropriation of Colorado River water.
1990CRC signed a joint resolution with the Bureau of Reclamation; the Nevada cities of Boulder City, Henderson, and North Las Vegas; the Big Bend Water District; and the Las Vegas Valley Water District establishing a joint position on the sharing of reductions in deliveries of Colorado River water to Nevada.
1990CRC approved the assignment and transfer of Basic Management, Inc.'s Colorado River water entitlement to the City of Henderson, Nevada.
1989CRC completed purchase of the Fort Mohave Valley Transfer Area.
1988CRC adopted a marketing plan for its share of electric power from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects post-1989 after a series of public information and comment forums.
1988CRC approved contracts with the Western Area Power Administration and contracts with its customers for delivery of power from the Parker-Davis Project from March 1, 1988, to September 30, 2008, and from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects from October 1, 1989, to September 30, 2004.
1987State law established priorities for the use of money in the Fort Mohave Valley Development Fund and authorized grants from the fund for public facilities. Approximately $2 million was allocated for capital improvements in Laughlin.
1987CRC approved a contract with the Western Area Power Administration and contracts with 11 CRC customers for delivery of power from the Boulder Canyon Project ( Hoover) from June 1, 1987, to September 30, 2017, in line with the Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984. CRC dismissed its lawsuit seeking an increased allocation.
1987CRC advanced Nevada's share of funds for the Uprating Program at Hoover Power Plant.
1986CRC adopted permanent regulations for processing proposals for development in the Eldorado Valley and Fort Mohave Valley transfer areas.
1985CRC adopted permanent regulations for marketing Nevada's share of electric power from the Boulder Canyon and Parker-Davis Projects post-1987 after a series of public information and comment forums.
1984Hoover Power Plant Act doubled the amount of capacity allocated to Nevada and gave the state 63% more energy, raising Nevada's share of Hoover power from 18% to nearly 24% of the power plant output.
1983CRC entered into a contract with the Big Bend Water District (Laughlin) for the annual delivery of 10,000 acre-feet of water annually to be received in increments. By 1989, the full allocation was received.
1982Second stage of the Southern Nevada Water System completed.
1979Western Area Power Administration proposed a plan for reallocating Hoover Dam power, leaving Nevada with original allocation. CRC filed a lawsuit in 1982 for an increased allocation.
1977Contract signed for construction of the second stage of the Southern Nevada Water System.
1974Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act authorized the construction, operation, and maintenance of works in the Colorado River Basin to control the salinity of Colorado River water available for use in the United States and Mexico. CRC participates in the Salinity Control Forums created by the act.
1971First phase of the Southern Nevada Water System placed into operation to divert and treat Colorado River water. Control and operation of Southern Nevada Water Project transferred by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to the CRC.
1971Las Vegas Valley Water District became the agent of the Colorado River Commission in the operation and maintenance of the Southern Nevada Water System.
1969Eldorado Valley land development policy approved.
1968Colorado River Commission designed and constructed the Alfred Merritt Smith Water Treatment Facility as part of the Southern Nevada Water System.
1967Funding approved for the first stage of the Southern Nevada Water System.
1966Colorado River Commission began the process of purchasing land in the Fort Mohave Valley (Laughlin). By 1989, 15,000 acres had been purchased and were developed for a major electric power station, hotels, a state park, and residential housing.
1965Colorado River Commission and United States contract for delivery of power from the Colorado River Storage Project to Nevada customers.
1965Nevada Legislature authorized CRC to work with the Bureau of Reclamation in the construction of the Southern Nevada Water Project.
1964U.S. Supreme Court decision in Arizona v. California confirmed apportionments of Colorado River water authorized in 1928 Boulder Canyon Project Act, including Nevada's allocation of 0.3 maf per year. The Decree in this case set many of the rules under which the river is operated.
1963Contract with the federal government increased Nevada's share of power from the Parker-Davis Project.
1963Glen Canyon Dam completed as part of the Colorado River Storage Project.
1960Colorado River Commission and Bureau of Reclamation conceived the Southern Nevada Water Project, consisting of the future federal water delivery facilities of the Robert B. Griffith Water Project and the future CRC-built facilities of the Alfred Merritt Smith Water Treatment Facility.
1959Fort Mohave Valley Development Law enacted, authorizing Colorado River Commission to acquire the Fort Mohave Valley Transfer Area.
1958Eldorado Valley Development Law enacted, authorizing Colorado River Commission to acquire the Eldorado Valley Transfer Area.
1957Role of CRC was expanded to include the acquisition of federal land -- 15,000 acres in the Fort Mohave Valley near Laughlin and 107,000 acres in Eldorado Valley near Boulder City. Congress gave Nevada the option to purchase for purposes of development and sale for the benefit of the state.
1956Colorado River Storage Project Act authorized construction of water storage and hydroelectric facilities within the Upper Basin.
1956Contract signed for delivery of power from the Colorado River Storage Project, now part of the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects.
1954Las Vegas Valley Water District requested a source of "cheap" power from Basic Management, Inc. (BMI). Subsequently, BMI sold a portion of power line to Southern Nevada Power Company.
1954Parker and Davis Dams consolidated into the Parker-Davis Project.
1950Contract signed for delivery of power from Davis Dam.
1947Amendment to 1935 enabling act established Colorado River Commission as the state's negotiator for acquisition of federally-owned industrial properties near Henderson, Nevada. The amendment allowed the CRC to purchase and sell the industrial plants, which eventually became the Basic Management Industrial Complex.
1942Parker Dam began operating.
1942Colorado River Commission enters into water delivery contract for Nevada's 0.3 maf allocation of Colorado River water.
1937Colorado River Commission protected Nevada's interests in allotment of Hoover Dam power and began to encourage industrial leaders to establish plants in southern Nevada.
1936CRC initiated a plan to bring water into Las Vegas Valley from Lake Mead for industrial use.
1936Contract signed for delivery of power from Hoover Dam. Lincoln County Power District and Southern Nevada Power Company provided power by the CRC.
1935Nevada Legislature created the Colorado River Commission of Nevada in place of the Colorado River Development Commission. The new commission had increased membership and more detailed duties, including the responsibility for securing and protecting Nevada's rights and interests in the waters of the Colorado River and in electric power generated on the river.
1928Boulder Canyon Project Act authorized construction of Hoover Dam and the division of Lower Basin water apportionment in annual amounts of 2.8 million acre-feet (maf) to Arizona, 4.4 maf to California, and 0.3 maf to Nevada.
1922Colorado River water apportionment for the lower basin states of Arizona, California, and Nevada established by the Colorado River Compact. Nevada Legislature ratifies the compact in 1923 and re-creates the Colorado River Development Commission.
1921Nevada Legislature formalized the Colorado River Development Commission. Members of the Commission actively participated in the development of the Colorado River Compact of 1922 and the Boulder Canyon Project Act of 1928.
1920Governor Boyle appointed an informal Commission on Colorado River Development to safeguard Nevada's interests in ongoing negotiations regarding the uses of the river.